Tag Archives: gigs

Black Lips, Cardiff Coal Exchange 01/05/08

Black Lips

Black Lips

“Someone that young really shouldn’t be able to grow a moustache that wild!” The curious facial hair that is perplexing certain members of the crowd tonight belongs to Black Lips bassist Jared Swilley. A full-on Eugene Hutz-style lip jacket it looks like Jared has glued a scrubbing brush below his nose. It looks incredible and seems to precede his every tumbling movement about the stage, as if the moustache is in charge, pulling Jared along behind it.
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The need to support music in Wales

Thought-provoking post by John Rostron from Plug 2 and co-promoter with Huw Stephens of Swn Festival.

Events like Swn don’t just fall into your lap, they’re dragged up from the pits of creativity, passion and courage. It’s a shame that an event that raises the profile of Cardiff/Wales and encourages much positive exposure for the cultural arts here – not to mention the global links it forges by bringing over international acts – is still struggling to source funding.

It makes you wonder if there wasn’t a ‘name’ like Huw Stephens behind it if Swn would have existed at all….

Read the post and bear it in mind if you’re ever in the circles of the people of influence.

Read the full post here

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London demo protesting current live music licensing regime – 22 Oct

For those in The Smoke: Equity will be demonstrating in Parliament Square this Thursday, October 22, 2009 from 11.00am to convince the government to undo the damage being done to live entertainment by the current licensing regime.

More info here

The background to the demonstration is that after lobbying by Equity, the Musicians’ Union and UK Music , the Department of Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee made a number of recommendations to Government for improvements to the Licensing Act. While the Government agreed to important changes that will make life easier for travelling entertainment such as circuses and Punch and Judy shows, it rejected three important recommendations:

  • An exemption for small venues.
  • A return of the “two-in-a-bar” rule where no licence is required.
  • Action to cut red tape.

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Trentemøller – London Forum, 14/04/08

Trentemøller

Trentemøller

Gigwise, April 2008

It’s 10:45pm at the Forum. There’s a thousand people in here and they’re horny as hell. Like the visuals of Betty Page earlier in the set, Trentemøller has built the audience into a sexual frenzy, teased them with ambient rushes, lashed them with filthy electro. And then, just as the they’re finally getting off, just as the last gushing thrusts of ‘Rykketid’ are due to burst forward like a massive volcano of electronic lust, he cuts the song, ends the foreplay, denies us our money shot. Anders Trentemøller, dressed in black, gothic fringe dripped in sweat, looks at the panting, shattered crowd, grins and walks off stage.
Any other artist would thrust to the very end, give the audience what they want and roll over and light up. Not Trentemøller. Intent on subverting our preconceptions about live dance music, Anders takes the seductive texture and moody electronica, so delicately crafted on his acclaimed debut The Last Resort, and crushes it into an infectious, raw experience that ranks alongside the best that Chemical Brothers, Primal Scream and the Prodigy can offer.
A bold statement, but when the crunching ‘Evil Dub’ gives way to the first evocative notes of ‘Moan’, it’s as rapturous as being on the receiving end of any performance of Loaded or Block Rockin’ Beats. Moan, an absolute classic of stirring, filthy analogue, intense dub and seductive melancholy, is just waiting for the world to catch up before it takes its rightful place as a festival classic. Hammering away at the banks of electronics and flanked by the incredible duo of Mikael Simpson and Henrik Vibskov on bass and drums respectively, Trentemøller turns such intricate electronica as Moan, or the David Lynch eerie-ness of ‘The Very Last Resort’, into a captivating experience.
‘Always Something Better’, bass punching you square in the back, beats pounding ever harder, takes the intensity ever further, and then ‘Rykketid’, with it’s swirling techno bleeps and marching Seven Nation Army sample, builds repeatedly to that suggestive sexual-electro peak. Of course it never comes. Trentemøller, like some cruel techno lothario leaves us in heat, arched on our backs and longing to be finished off, knowing that we’ll be back for more.

It’s 10:45pm at the Forum. There’s a thousand people in here and they’re horny as hell. Like the visuals of Betty Page earlier in the set, Trentemøller has built the audience into a sexual frenzy, teased them with ambient rushes, lashed them with filthy electro. And then, just as the they’re finally getting off, just as the last gushing thrusts of ‘Rykketid’ are due to burst forward like a massive volcano of electronic lust, he cuts the song, ends the foreplay, denies us our money shot. Anders Trentemøller, dressed in black, gothic fringe dripped in sweat, looks at the panting, shattered crowd, grins and walks off stage.

Any other artist would thrust to the very end, give the audience what they want and roll over and light up. Not Trentemøller. Intent on subverting our preconceptions about live dance music, Anders takes the seductive texture and moody electronica, so delicately crafted on his acclaimed debut The Last Resort, and crushes it into an infectious, raw experience that ranks alongside the best that Chemical Brothers, Primal Scream and the Prodigy can offer.

A bold statement, but when the crunching ‘Evil Dub’ gives way to the first evocative notes of ‘Moan’, it’s as rapturous as being on the receiving end of any performance of Loaded or Block Rockin’ Beats. Moan, an absolute classic of stirring, filthy analogue, intense dub and seductive melancholy, is just waiting for the world to catch up before it takes its rightful place as a festival classic. Hammering away at the banks of electronics and flanked by the incredible duo of Mikael Simpson and Henrik Vibskov on bass and drums respectively, Trentemøller turns such intricate electronica as Moan, or the David Lynch eerie-ness of ‘The Very Last Resort’, into a captivating experience.

‘Always Something Better’, bass punching you square in the back, beats pounding ever harder, takes the intensity ever further, and then ‘Rykketid’, with it’s swirling techno bleeps and marching Seven Nation Army sample, builds repeatedly to that suggestive sexual-electro peak. Of course it never comes. Trentemøller, like some cruel techno lothario leaves us in heat, arched on our backs and longing to be finished off, knowing that we’ll be back for more.

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